I, Writer
Tim Richards
Freelance Writer

Follow Me:
Facebook
Twitter
Google+

LinkedIn

Home Feature Articles | Reviews & Previews

Feature Articles


Game of Fans
The Sunday Age

 7 May
2017

"'Winter is coming.' That's true for Melbourne at this time of year, and also for the fantasy land of Westeros. We'll have to wait until July to see the next instalment in the power struggle for the Iron Throne and the threat of the demonic White Walkers. In the meantime, Melbourne's Game of Thrones devotees are staving off our own impending winter by attending a convention devoted to the series: ThronesCon..."

Previewing a fan convention devoted to the popular fantasy TV series
Game of Thrones.

[Read the full article here]

Modern Day Myth Makers
The Sunday Age

29 May
2016

"'I wanted to create a superhero for my son,' says Ryan Griffen, the creator of upcoming ABC TV series Cleverman. 'A hero that was based on Aboriginal culture. When I was growing up, I would always tell people I was an Aboriginal, and would get into fights because of it. My son's nine now. He's very proud and calls himself a blackfella, and talks about his Aboriginal culture, but there'll be a point where people question that. So that was seeded into the growth of the character as well...'"

Previewing the TV series Cleverman and looking at Aboriginal superheroes of the past
.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Sussing out Melbourne’s Mysterious Rules of Busking
Issimo Magazine, 29 January 2014

"The process by which buskers are allowed onto Melbourne’s streets seems a bit of a mystery.  I liked to imagine a scenario something like that in the famous beer ad modelled on the movie Flashdance. You know the sort of thing: singers belting out tunes, dancers flinging themselves about, human statues doing nothing much, while a primly-dressed panel sits at one end of a huge audition hall and scratches notes..."

Examing how the City of Melbourne applies rules and regulations to street performers.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Why Doctor Who Will Last Forever
Issimo Magazine,
9 November 2013

"The basic conceit of the show – a ship’s crew travelling to distant lands full of strange and wonderful creatures – is an age-old concept, employed by Homer in The Odyssey. This resemblance was particularly apt during the tenure of the First Doctor, played by William Hartnell, who kidnapped his first travelling companions and had no control over where his space-time vessel, the TARDIS, would take them..."

Exploring literary and other cultural connections of the TV show Doctor Who on its 50th anniversary.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

How to Grasp Guilt – Literally
Issimo Magazine, 16 October 2013

"Oscar Wilde only wrote one novel, but The Picture of Dorian Gray is a cracking yarn. 'The book is a ‘deal with the devil’ story, where he never ages and never has to  confront his sins or his guilt,' says Room of Regret co-creator and director Emma Valente. 'It’s all manifested in an external object, as his sins get greater and greater until they peak. We’ve taken that idea and really tried to physicalise it...'"

Previewing Room of Regret, a theatrical interpretation of Wilde's novel in the 2013 Melbourne Festival.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Hidden Passions
Issimo Magazine, 2 October 2013

"Art imitating life is one thing, but art imitating art is quite another. In the case of the Melbourne Festival production Brief Encounter, it’s actually a matter of art imitating art imitating art. This play about star-crossed married lovers in 1930s Britain is based on David Lean’s 1945 film of the same name, which was itself inspired by Noel Coward’s play Still Life..."

Previewing Brief Encounter, a theatrical interpretation of a classic film in the 2013 Melbourne Festival.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

A Virtual World in Darkness
Issimo Magazine, 20 September 2013

"If you’ve ever sworn under your breath at fellow audience members fiddling with their smartphones during a live arts performance, you’ll be shocked by Blindscape. Not only does the team behind this Melbourne Fringe Festival show want you to have your devices out, they’re distributing them. 'It’s a circus show, and it’s a circus in the dark,' explains creator Skye Gellmann. 'It’s the audience who lights the performance...'"

Previewing Blindscape, an unconventional circus show in the 2013 Melbourne Fringe Festival.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Mr Minutiae
Issimo Magazine, 17 September 2013

"In 2011, Martin staged Tony Martin Reads Stuff Out at Trades Hall. 'Because the stories had so much dialogue in them and I had to jump through all the voices, it was like watching a one man radio play,' he says. 'And after I did that season I had a lot of people mention The Yeti, asking me to read that one.' So Martin bowed to popular demand, crafting that short story into a new show - tall tales about living in the boarding house..."

Previewing Tony Martin's show for the 2013 Melbourne Fringe Festival, The Yeti.
Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Pulling Punchlines
The Sunday Age
, 24 March 2013

"Ronny Chieng has been on a mission to make being Chinese cool again. And he hasn't felt the need to sweet-talk his audiences along the way. When the Chinese-Malaysian comedian takes to the stage, he radiates a world-weary attitude, leaning louchely against the mike stand while bemoaning the geeky, uptight Western stereotype of Chinese people. He pines for the lost era of Bruce Lee, he says, when being of Chinese extraction was undeniably, globally cool..."

Interviewing up-and-coming comedian Ronny Chieng.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Escape for Artists in Morocco Retreat
The Age, 22 May 2012

"While popular uprisings have shaken the Middle East over the past year, the relatively unaffected North African kingdom of Morocco has remained a destination for Western travellers. It's in this country's remote desert hinterland that Melbourne woman Karen Hadfield has established an artists' retreat, within the village of Tissardmine near the Algerian border..."

Interviewing the creator of a remote artists' retreat in Saharan Morocco.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Four Men in a Boat: Talking Masculinity at World's End
The Age, 19 May 2012

"These stakes are raised in the theatre's new work, Liberate Yourself from My Vice-like Grip!!!. This time there are four men, and they're in a unique setting - within the hull of the last ship on earth as it cruises the endless ocean created by climate change. 'It's at the end of our planet's life,' says McCarthy, 'At the point of apocalypse - a progression from where we're headed at the moment...'"

Previewing a play about four men in a boat at the end of the world.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Unexpected Glimpse of Revolution
The Age, 3 April 2012

"Akmal Saleh is facing the stand-up comic's equivalent of that tricky second novel - the need to move on to new verbal territory in step with one's advancing age. 'The thing is, I'm old now,' he says. 'I'm 48. I can't get away with just doing jokes any more. I really feel that I want to say something that I believe in, or moves me, without being pretentious...'"

Interviewing comedian Akmal Saleh about his comedy and the revolution in Egypt.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Rebuilding Rome for Modern-day Audiences
The Age, 3 April 2012

"Rome wasn’t built in a day and all roads lead there; both well-worn sayings fit neatly with the Ancient Rome exhibition at Docklands. There have been plenty of visiting exhibitions of antiquity but this is more an art installation than a museum display. It’s a collection of painstakingly crafted replicas and models of ancient Roman items, including war machines, catapults, mosaics and board games..."

Previewing an exhibition of recreated antiquity in Melbourne, Australia.

Available for republication (print only).

Wits Get Bit on the Side
The Age, 24 March 2012

"To stage one Comedy Festival show may be regarded as a challenge; to stage two looks like recklessness. At least, that's what Oscar Wilde might say if he was around to peruse the program of the 2012 Melbourne International Comedy Festival. In culmination of a growing trend, several well-known comics are staging more specialised shows in addition to their main solo acts..."

Previewing several shows in the Melbourne International Comedy Festival.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Factory of Stars in Cultural Cameo
The Age, 22 March 2012

"The former Wertheim factory site on Richmond's Bendigo Street has lived an interesting life - it started out in 1908 as a piano factory, then became a Heinz factory before being transformed into the headquarters of Channel Nine. This month, however, there's been a spark of life in the old dream factory as it's been temporarily reinvented as the Richmond Weekender, hosting a cafe, cinema and market..."

Profiling a pop-up attraction in a suburb of Melbourne, Australia.
Available for republication (print only).

Intimate Backstreet Venue a Perfect Fit for Jazz Maestro
The Age, 20 March 2012

"As the mosquito drone of the grand prix engines faded from the air outside the InterContinental Melbourne at The Rialto last Friday evening, jazz legend James Morrison was about to fill its Market Lane Bar with more melodious sounds. With the musician tucked into one end of the room along with a band, the compact space of wood-lined walls and low lounges took on a hint of backstreet jazz club..."

Outlining a series of jazz gigs in central Melbourne, Australia.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Sunset at Toszek
Plum Lines, Spring 2012

"So I return to the bench to sit in the light drizzle, looking up at the windows and imagining Plum looking back at me - we are, after all, separated not by space but only by the trifling matter of seven decades. If I could somehow pierce that veil of time and shout up to him from the roadway, what would I say? “Don’t do the broadcasts!” comes to mind. If he’d listen, it would save everyone a lot of heartache..."

Visiting the town in Poland where author PG Wodehouse was once held prisoner.

Available for republication (print and Web).
Images available.


Stone the Crows
The Age, 26 November 2011

"I've only recently watched the movie Rise of the Planet of the Apes, so I'm understandably unnerved to discover a giant bust of a chimpanzee in bushland on the edge of Melbourne's suburban sprawl. A minute before, I was strolling across neat lawns behind the McClelland Gallery, admiring a gold-faced statue of Dame Joan Sutherland. Now I'm following a narrow track through native trees and things have taken a more primal turn..."

Investigating a sculpture park on the outskirts of Melbourne, Victoria.
Available for republication (print only).

Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Gritty Tale of St Kilda Life Inspires Tour
The Age, 2 September 2011

"Private investigator Felix Baker recently walked the streets of St Kilda, talking to homeless people and sex workers in an attempt to find a young runaway called Becky. Just another sad tale of a disadvantaged kid becoming entangled in a shadowy world of drugs, prostitution and sleeping rough, you might think. Except that both Felix and Becky are fictional, the lead characters within a new audio tour of St Kilda entitled Looking for a Girl?..."

Profiling an audio tour of Melbourne's beachside suburb which draws on real life.
Available for republication (print only).

A Man of His Crimes
The Age, 13 August 2011

"Genet was brought up on the wrong side of the Parisian tracks, the son of a prostitute, then turned to theft before joining the Foreign Legion. As a poet, novelist and playwright, he became friends with the likes of Jean Cocteau, Jean-Paul Sartre and Pablo Picasso, who helped keep him out of prison. This colourful back story gave him plenty to draw upon in his work; and The Maids is one of his more memorable creations..."

Previewing The Maids, a play of maids and murderous desires by Jean Genet.
Available for republication (print only).


[Read the full article here]

Chapter and Verse
The Age, 7 May 2011

"The poem, set after the arcade closes at night, has a bunch of ornaments breaking out of fashion boutique Corky St Clair and running the length of the underpass. It's an amusing poetic romp, a light-hearted urban fairytale that provokes chuckles at the antics of the newly animated objects and their very Melbourne artiness..."

Following a downloadable DIY poetry tour through downtown Melbourne, Victoria.
Available for republication (print only).

Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Selling Spirituality with Silkscreens
The Age, 3 May 2011

"'GET WITH THE ACTION'. It’s the type of advertising slogan whipped up by the 1960s ad men from Mad Men. In Sister Mary Corita Kent’s 1966 artwork For Emergency Use Soft Shoulder, however, it’s been cheekily appropriated to sell spirituality. For the artistic nun who created the work, the product on offer was God..."

Previewing the first-ever Melbourne exhibition of the art of Sister Corita Kent.
Available for republication (print only).

Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Putting It All Online as Comedians Sell Their Soul for a Laugh
The Age, 11 April 2011

"Anyone who's strolled past the Melbourne Town Hall on a sunny April day knows what it's like to be the centre of attention. Passers-by are assailed by Comedy Festival performers bearing leaflets, a publicity strategy known as 'flyering'. They're more entertaining than charity muggers, but there's no mistaking the scent of desperation in the air..."

Discovering how performers at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival attract publicity in the 21st century.
Available for republication (print only).

Images available.

[Read the full article here]

On the Creative Trail
The Age, 19 March 2011

"'Hal's Wigs, Merrylight Wigs, Di'Napoli Men's Hair Pieces,' I murmur, reading the labels on a column of cardboard boxes that reaches from floor to ceiling. Each title is stencilled in an old-fashioned font that suggests a commercial enterprise of the 1950s or '60s. I catch myself reaching up to check the status of my own hairline, as the artist might have expected me to do..."

Joining an art gallery walking tour through the centre of Melbourne, Victoria.
Available for republication (print only).

Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Making a Scene
Virgin Blue Voyeur, March 2011

"There are many big events on the Melbourne calendar, so much so that it has become an attraction itself. In March you can choose between (or combine) the Grand Prix, the Fashion Festival, the Food and Wine Festival, the Queer Film Festival, the International Comedy Festival, the International Flower and Garden Show, and the decades-old Moomba Festival. However, one exciting element of the city’s cultural offerings that often eludes visitors is its vibrant independent theatre scene..."

Discovering the gems of Melbourne's thriving independent theatre scene.
Not available for republication.

[Read the full article here] (jump to p82)


Funny Bones
Jetstar Magazine, March 2011

"'Nothing succeeds like success,' goes the old saying, and it could well work as the
motto for the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. Since its inception in 1987, the festival has become one of Australia’s biggest arts events - with over 400,000 tickets sold last year. Now the Comedy Festival is turning 25. What accounts for its extraordinary success?"

Revealing the highlights of the 25th Melbourne International Comedy Festival.
Not available for republication.

[Read the full article here] (jump to p46)


Out Cast Theatre Preview
The Age, 13 January 2011

"There's an unwritten rule in contemporary theatre - that you can include as much sex and nudity as you like, as long as it's tastefully understated. This is not, however, a view shared by Steven Dawson. Since 1997, Dawson has been writing plays that exploit the sheer cut-through marketing power of titles such as Big Dicks on Stage, Filthy Pervert Seeks Same and Naked."

Preview of Mr Braithwaite Has a New Boy, a play by gay theatre company Out Cast.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

The Older Kids on the Block
The Age, 8 January 2011

"IT manager Ryan McNaught has a novel way of filling his out-of-office hours: he builds models out of Lego, the popular interlocking building bricks patented by Danish toy company owner Godtfred Christiansen in 1958. They're not, however, comparable to the simple misshapen houses you constructed as a kid. McNaught's creations are sizeable constructions, meticulously planned and involving hundreds of bricks."

Preview of Brickvention, a convention for adult fans of Lego.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Unleashing the Inner Beast
The Age, 30 November 2010

"Which do you prefer: Mickey Mouse or Daffy Duck? The good-natured animated animal characters from the Disney stable, or the sassier gang from Warner Brothers? It’s the sort of question that might be exercising the minds of furry fans as they gather in Melbourne for the 12th Midfur convention. Furries are devotees of anthropomorphic art, which features humanoid forms with animal characteristics."

Preview of Midfur, an annual convention celebrating anthropomorphic art.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

A Necktie a Day Keeps the Portrait Artist at Play
The Age, 5 November 2010

"No matter how you look at it, the suit gets a bad rap: ‘suits’ as a derisive term for corporate warriors, ‘men in suits’ to hint at masculine bias in the boardroom. Luckily the suit does have one true friend: the tie. This humble piece of neckwear has been allowed to be the one free and easy item in men’s power uniform, lending it the ability to mitigate the suit’s conformist look."

Profile of The Tie Project, a blog featuring an artist wearing a different tie each day.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Sex, Sport and Power Plays
The Age, 13 August 2010

"Despite the progress made in achieving equality between men and women over the past half-century, the abuse of sexual power by sportsmen keeps raising its head. Now it's inpired a new documentary play about sexual violence and football, This Kind of Ruckus. Drawing on rugby’s sex scandals of recent years, the production starkly examines the psychology of sex and consent in both the sporting arena and the wider world."

Preview of This Kind of Ruckus, a theatre work about sport and sexual violence.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

The World's Smallest Joke is Big in the Apple Isle
The Age, 23 July 2010

"Stop me if you've heard this one - 683 punters walk into a Hobart bar to watch a comedy gig, and call it a comedy festival. In 2002 it seemed pretty funny, according to Hobart Comedy Festival producer Craig Wellington. 'We put on a stage show over summer, and called it "The Hobart Comedy Festival (The World’s Smallest Cultural Event)" as a joke.' But it turned out to not be a passing gag..."

A preview of the Hobart Comedy Festival, with quotes from comedian Hannah Gadsby.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Thespis Wakes from Slumber
The Age, 12 April 2010

"Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad. But what happens when the gods move beyond wrath and manipulation, and simply become tired, worn out, and in need of a cup of tea and a good lie-down? They hire temps, of course, a group of actors who can fill in on Mount Olympus until they feel like returning to their heavenly abode. That’s the plot, in any case, of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Thespis."

A preview of the Australian premiere of Thespis, Gilbert and Sullivan's first-ever collaboration.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

Pot-Pourri of Opera Comes Alive Under the Stars
The Age, 6 March 2010

"Picture this... it’s Brunswick in the 1980s, well before gentrification swept across the suburb. A baritone walks into a dingy jazz club, accompanied by a female soprano. He exchanges a brief nod with the barman, who’s rumoured to keep a gun under the bar, and the duo ascends the stage."

A preview of operatic musical group Pot-Pourri's show From Opera to Broadway... Under the Stars.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

[Read the full article here]

A Three-Legged Dragon
The Age, 30 January 2010

"If a nerd like Lawrence Leung could revive the Rubik’s Cube in his TV series Choose Your Own Adventure, the time must be ripe for a geek-chic makeover of the 12-sided dice. Enter musical comedy trio Tripod, whose latest production is an exaltation of that epic pre-console time-waster: the role-playing game known as Dungeons and Dragons."

A preview of comedy trio Tripod's upcoming show, Tripod vs the Dragon.
Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

Showtime!
The Age, 12 December 2009

"What would Christmas be without nuts? Or indeed, without The Nutcracker? This fairytale ballet by Tchaikovsky is the perfect way to introduce kids to dance, though adults will also be enchanted by the adventures of our heroine, Marie, and the toys she encounters along the way. 'Is there a magical transformation and a handsome prince?' I hear you ask. How could there not be? Sugar plum fairies included."

A guide to Melbourne's performing arts highlights in the summer of 2009-2010.

Available for republication (print only).
Images available.

Art for Thought's Sake on a Pub Wall
The Age, 16 May 2009

"Though the satirical illustration has been around since the 18th century, and the cartoon is still a fixture on newspapers' editorial pages, they've had a bumpy transition to the Internet, where users click to specific stories rather than view entire pages. Enter a new medium - the wall of a popular inner-city music venue. But why decide to feature cartoon and comic strip art in the first place?"

Talking to the creators of Strip Billboard, a street art project in Melbourne, Australia.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Mind the Gap: A tale of parallel worlds, Egyptology, ancient prophecy, malevolent felines... and underground railway stations.
April 2009

"Darius stepped away from the crack in the floor, now visibly expanding and contracting like a hungry mouth. He looked away from the sphere and caught Kovary’s eye. She appeared as mystified as he. Then, turning back, he saw that something was forming slowly within the golden light. It was vaguely humanoid, though it was almost three metres tall. There was something… animal… about the shape of its head."

My SF/fantasy thriller novel, Mind the Gap, was published in 2009 and is available for purchase on Amazon.com. For more details, visit the book's promotional website.

A Cool Night Out
The Age, 2 January 2008

"Tired of Hollywood fare? Had enough of third-rate sequels involving comic book characters and bad computer-generated effects? Getting a headache from lurid multiplex carpets and overconsumption of popcorn? ... This late night offering is sure to get you pondering, even if it’s only along the lines of 'What were they thinking?'"

Casting a cinematic eye over Melbourne's quirkiest movie venues.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Cultural Pilgrimage
The Age, 9 January 2007

"Riddle me this: what do you get when you cross a cow up a tree, a giant eagle, and a bridge that looks like a Slinky? Find out on the Docklands Art Journey, a walk through the strange and stimulating public art of the former port area..."

A look at 20 great cultural experiences in Melbourne, from galleries to public art.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Death of a TV Anomaly
The Age, 15 June 2006

"When Six Feet Under finally expires from natural causes after its final episode next Monday, it'll be the end of a long and intense emotional journey for its fans. But the drama about the lives of a family running a Los Angeles funeral home was never going to go quietly..."

A farewell to the cult favourite TV program about a family running a funeral home.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

From Myth to Manga
The Age, 8 November 2005

"The future is taking shape in a sunlit studio high above Flinders Lane. Shepherd’s workspace is located in the Nicholas Building, a grand office block from 1926 and home to a community of artists and artisans. Like the building, the CybaFaeries studio is cluttered with reminders of the past. But the latest technology is also present, as Shepherd works on his current project, crafting robots as pieces of art that will move and see."

A profile of a man who makes 'fine art robots' in his studio in Melbourne's city centre.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Whatever They Wanted, Lola Gave Them
The Age, 2 October 2005

"Bendigo had never seen a night at the theatre quite like it. On the evening of 2 April 1856, residents of the thriving gold mining town had paid five shillings to see a performance of Asmodeus, or The Little Devil. It wasn’t the play they were interested in, but its star, Lola Montez. Celebrated and condemned in the world’s media, she was a magnet for scandal and gossip. However, she was about to be upstaged..."

The story of the scandalous Lola Montez and her 1855 tour of Melbourne and the goldfields.
Available for republication (print only).

RedPlanet Revisited
The Age, 5 September 2005

"Like Another Planet, Redletter aimed to provide a voice to marginalised groups. It also established its own campaigns, usually addressing causes outside mainstream politics. The result was a steady stream of big, bold posters exposing new ideas and events to the world. They were a godsend to cash-strapped grassroots organisations, and activists hoping to insert a new viewpoint into the heads of unsuspecting passers-by."

The history of Melbourne's famous anti-establishment poster presses.
Available for republication (print only).

[Read the full article here]

Log-on Laughs
Herald Sun, 26 April 2004

"There’s nothing funny about technology. Just think about it: spam, pop-ups, incompatible hardware and help files poorly translated from Japanese. Worst of all, computer crashes. There’s nothing remotely funny about your hard drive crashing..."

Examines a number of Comedy Festival shows focusing on the funny side of technology. 
Available for republication (print and Web).

Ghosts of Futures Past
The West Australian, 3 April 2004

"Nostradamus had enough sense to keep it vague. His mysterious predictions kept the punters guessing well past his death. If only his descendants had learned from his wisdom. Time and again, 20th century prognosticators set their books, films and TV series in a specific year of the future. In many cases, these years have now actually passed, enabling us to check the accuracy of their predictions."

Nostalgia piece about TV shows set in a future year which has now passed.
Available for republication (print and Web).


Reviews & Previews



I've reviewed and previewed a broad range of productions, including theatre, cabaret and comedy, for the following publications:
Examples are available on request.
Arts

This page contains examples of my arts writing. Each entry includes a sample paragraph, and indications of available rights.

If you'd like to republish one of these pieces, or would like a new arts piece, please get in touch via the contacts below:

.
Archive
All articles in this archive are available for republication (fee to be negotiated). Articles can be rewritten to meet your style or length requirements. Please contact me by email with your query.

articles by subject:
Travel

Arts

Life

Science & Technology

Pets

 

.
Contact

postal:
Tim Richards
507/225 Elizabeth St
Melbourne VIC 3000
Australia

email:
tim@iwriter.com.au

phone:
0411-242327
(international +61-411-242327)

.
Follow me
.
Buy my mobile apps




Buy my books


Take action
Blog
Read my weekly travel blog Aerohaveno
Apps
Download my mobile apps
Books
Browse my books (including ebooks)
Travel
Check out my published travel articles by location
Arts
Look over my arts-related articles
Services
Discover my skills, services, courses and talks


General: Services | Archive: Travel.Arts.Life.Sci/Tech.Pets
Travel: Articles | Books | Blog | Apps
Follow Me: Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn
.
All content © Tim Richards 2013